Thursday File Coffee

coffee cartoon - for the love of coffee

coffee cartoon - for the love of coffee

— 2 weeks ago with 8 notes
#tf coffee cartoon  #for the love of coffee 
Coffee with Jerry Seinfeld and Julia Louis-Dreyfus

Coffee with Jerry Seinfeld and Julia Louis-Dreyfus

— 2 weeks ago with 6 notes
#tf coffee moment  #Jerry Seinfeld  #Julia Louis-Dreyfus 
Coffee Mug - ‘I drink coffee for your protection’

Coffee Mug - ‘I drink coffee for your protection’

— 2 weeks ago with 6 notes
#TF Mugs  #I drink coffee for your protection 

Blend for Yourself
Frosty mocha milk shakes http://www.purewow.com
Chocolate. Vanilla. Strawberry. When it comes to milk shakes, everyone has a favorite flavor, and we totally respect that. (Hey, you do you.) But for now, let’s put personal preference aside to celebrate mocha milk shakes. We blend coffee ice cream with milk, cocoa and espresso powders, and grated dark chocolate. (We’ll give you a second to read that last line again.) And of course no shake is complete without some whipped cream—homemade is preferred, but store-bought is fine. So grab a straw, and probably a spoon, and get to it.

Ingredients
4 medium scoops (about 1½ cups) coffee ice cream
⅔ cup whole milk
2 tablespoons dark cocoa powder, plus extra for garnish
1 tablespoon instant espresso powder
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
⅛ teaspoon almond extract
½ cup grated dark chocolate
½ cup heavy cream, whipped (or see Finishing Touches)
Directions
1 - In a blender, or using an immersion blender, pulse the ice cream, milk, cocoa powder and espresso powder to combine.
2 - When the mixture is smooth, add the extracts and dark chocolate. Blend to combine.
3 - Pour the milk shake into two glasses and top generously with whipped cream. Finish with a sprinkle of cocoa powder. Serve immediately.

Finishing Touches - It’s the details that count! Try these tips
1 - Coffee ice-cubes
For extra-bold coffee flavor, freeze leftover coffee in ice-cube trays. When making the milk shakes, reduce the milk to ½ cup and blend in two or three coffee cubes.
2 - Instead of using plain whipped cream, top the shakes with ‘Salted Caramel Whipped Cream’.

— 2 weeks ago with 6 notes
#mocha milk shake  #TF Coffee Recipe 
The moka pot is a stove-top coffee maker which produces coffee by passing hot water pressurized by steam through ground coffee. It was patented for the first time in Italy by the inventor Luigi De Ponti for Alfonso Bialetti, in 1933. Bialetti Industrie continues to produce the same model under the name “Moka Express”.

The moka pot is a stove-top coffee maker which produces coffee by passing hot water pressurized by steam through ground coffee. It was patented for the first time in Italy by the inventor Luigi De Ponti for Alfonso Bialetti, in 1933. Bialetti Industrie continues to produce the same model under the name “Moka Express”.

— 2 weeks ago with 6 notes
#TF Coffee  #moka pot  #1933  #Luigi De Ponti  #Alfonso Bialetti 
UC Davis Will Offer Classes Dedicated To The Science Of CoffeeOur understanding of coffee can often lean more toward alchemy than, say, actual chemistry. But that might be changing.by Chris Gayomali - http://www.fastcompany.com — March 14 2014Coffee is the lifeblood that powers much of the modern workforce. It keeps our brains lubricated and is generally considered good for our health when consumed within reason.And yet, we still understand relatively little about the science behind it—its chemical composition, how it metabolizes in the body, etc. It’s oftentimes why brewing itself can lean more toward alchemy than, say, actual chemistry. Coffee is “actually the number one tracked food item,” Jawbone’s Travis Bogard told Fast Company recently. “Clearly, it’s something a lot of people are tracking.”Which makes our current dearth of coffee-related research somewhat puzzling. But thankfully, the knowledge gap appears to be narrowing. NPR reports the University of California, Davis, opened a new “Coffee Center,” and is hosting its first research conference this week. Its goal is to bring “scientific inquiry to the quality, health, and sustainability of coffee.” It will offer students courses—full degrees won’t be available (yet)—across a range of topics, like:1 Coffee genetics2 Natural fermentation of coffee berries3  Analytics of coffee composition, structure, and function4  Sensory aspects of coffee5 Coffee as potential prebiotic6 Metabolic aspects of coffee consumption7 Coffee engineering: optimizing processing, value, and sustainability8 Education for undergraduates, graduate students, and industry9 Social and cultural life of coffeeThe idea originally started as a small seminar called the “Design of Coffee,” put together by two professors in the chemical engineering department, before ballooning. UC Davis already has programs in place concerned with the study of beer and winemaking; as J. Bruce German, director of the Foods for Health Institute at UC Davis told NPR, “There aren’t a lot of things that so many people consume several times a day, every day.”—www.thursdayfile.com—Q - Are we overthinking Coffee?

UC Davis Will Offer Classes Dedicated To The Science Of Coffee
Our understanding of coffee can often lean more toward alchemy than, say, actual chemistry. But that might be changing.
by Chris Gayomali - http://www.fastcompany.com — March 14 2014
Coffee is the lifeblood that powers much of the modern workforce. It keeps our brains lubricated and is generally considered good for our health when consumed within reason.
And yet, we still understand relatively little about the science behind it—its chemical composition, how it metabolizes in the body, etc. It’s oftentimes why brewing itself can lean more toward alchemy than, say, actual chemistry. Coffee is “actually the number one tracked food item,” Jawbone’s Travis Bogard told Fast Company recently. “Clearly, it’s something a lot of people are tracking.”
Which makes our current dearth of coffee-related research somewhat puzzling. But thankfully, the knowledge gap appears to be narrowing. NPR reports the University of California, Davis, opened a new “Coffee Center,” and is hosting its first research conference this week. Its goal is to bring “scientific inquiry to the quality, health, and sustainability of coffee.” It will offer students courses—full degrees won’t be available (yet)—across a range of topics, like:
1 Coffee genetics
2 Natural fermentation of coffee berries
3  Analytics of coffee composition, structure, and function
4  Sensory aspects of coffee
5 Coffee as potential prebiotic
6 Metabolic aspects of coffee consumption
7 Coffee engineering: optimizing processing, value, and sustainability
8 Education for undergraduates, graduate students, and industry
9 Social and cultural life of coffee
The idea originally started as a small seminar called the “Design of Coffee,” put together by two professors in the chemical engineering department, before ballooning. UC Davis already has programs in place concerned with the study of beer and winemaking; as J. Bruce German, director of the Foods for Health Institute at UC Davis told NPR, “There aren’t a lot of things that so many people consume several times a day, every day.”

www.thursdayfile.com

Q - Are we overthinking Coffee?

— 3 weeks ago with 6 notes
#tf coffee study  #TF Health  #Fast Company  #research 
Morning love."I LOVE my coffee in the morning.  I don’t think I can function well without a good cup of strong black coffee.  No sugar or cream, just a good ol’ strong black one. " - GrizIllustration by Griz and Norm

Morning love.
"I LOVE my coffee in the morning.  I don’t think I can function well without a good cup of strong black coffee.  No sugar or cream, just a good ol’ strong black one. " - Griz
Illustration by Griz and Norm

— 3 weeks ago with 7 notes
#tf coffee illustration  #tf art  #griz and norm  #morning coffee